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Five Essentials to Making the Break

Over the last few months, you’ve been getting out of bed a little slower in the morning. You’ve become more irritated by the tasks on your plate for the week than motivated by them and you’ve designated “payday” into your planner’s calendar at least two months into the future.

 

Let’s face it: It’s time to do both you and your employer (who is bound to notice your discontent in time) a favor and start mining the job market for something new. Here are five essentials:

 

• Act enthusiastic about the prospect of being hired.

 

Both you and the employer should be equally eager to get started. Getting revved up during the first-impression stage isn’t enough, either. You should feel that same energy during every follow-up meeting. Remember: The way you feel about becoming part of this company is going to permeate from you during the interview, whether you realize it or not. A lukewarm response from you will virtually guarantee the same from the interviewer.

 

• Demonstrate your ability to do the job, not your ability to create a resume

 

Employers do not base their decision solely on your appearance and your resume. The employer needs to know you can actually do the job. Answer questions regarding your accomplishments with specifics, rather than clichés. Gather data in advance to support your claims, and avoid beginning your answers with “I-me-my;” use “we-us-our,” instead.

 

• Request a clear job description.

 

Know exactly what you’re getting into. Exactly what would you be hired to accomplish and exactly how will your success be measured? That kind of clarity is essential for both you and the employer.

 

 

• Accept only a position which challenges you. Otherwise you’ll get restless very quickly

 

Those who keep growing and evolving professionally are happier and more satisfied with their jobs than those who are stuck in a position or job type that doesn’t challenge them.

 

• Meet your future co-workers

 

After your interview, take a minute to talk the people you’ll be working with before accepting any job offer. Check the fit. Feel the chemistry. If there isn’t any, then you need to move on. Don’t waste anyone’s time, least of all your own.

 

There’s nothing complex or unrealistic about finding a job that is a better fit. With such a wealth of talented, dedicated applicants out there and companies who are thrilled to recruit them, matches made in heaven occur every day––not only in romantic movies, but with people just like you.

 

John Uprichard is president of Find Great People International, a recruiting firm that specializes in finding outstanding applicants for great companies. Reach John at juprichard@fpg.com, or visit www.fgp.com.

 

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